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Congratulations to Lena from Germany and her great song Satellite!

Lena definitely stood out from the bulk of singers with glam costumes, glitter, fireworks, and fanfares.  She was modest but charming in her little black dress and bright smile. She was herself, and this earned her the love of Europe. Go Lena!


A few days before the Eurovision finals (May 27 and 29th), Miro changed the concept of his song, translated it into English, and came up with a new video.

The new concept has an exceptional sexual charge. This is no longer a song about truthfulness, purity, and love that only angels and children possess. Now, Miro sings of lost innocence, losing your faith in angels, and growing up in lies. The new clip portrays “the little girl, a fallen angel” as a promiscuous teenage girl who brings salvation “when the lights go down.” In the video clip, Luiza Grigorova, voted the sexiest Bulgarian woman by the Maxim magazine, is a lover and “shelter” to two “little boys” simultaneously.

 This version of the song and the new video remind me of Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers, a movie about a young American who starts a sensual friendship and companionship with a French brother and sister.  Both the song and the movie carry the idea that there is no such thing as holy innocence because even angels crave the forbidden love.

I personally like Miro’s change because it better reflects his artistic style: his songs are often very provocative but they have condemned grave issues such as domestic violence and drug use. In this sense, the new “You are an Angel” conveys a far more mature and symbolically rich message than its predecessor “Angel si ti” (read my previous post).

 If only I could persuade everyone to vote for Miro and Bulgaria on the Eurovision finals!


The Bulgarian alphabet is a Cyrillic alphabet and, since Bulgaria’s accession to the EU in 2007, the third official alphabet in the European Union. You can find Cyrillic letters on the euro bills side by side with the Latin and the Greek letters.

Cyril and Methodius holding a scroll with the Bulgarian alphabet. A mural by the Bulgarian icon-painter Zahari Zograf

Most Slavic nations use the Cyrillic alphabet: Belarusian, Bulgarian, Russian, Serb, Macedonian, Montenegrin, and Ukrainian. Some non-Slavic nations also use it: Moldovan, Kazakh, Uzbek, Kyrgyz, Tajik, Mongolian, the people of the Caucasus and Siberia. It is also the official alphabet of the Church Slavonic language of the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Church.

The Cyrillic alphabet is a simplified version of the Glagolitic alphabet. The Glagolitic alphabet was created under the orders of the Byzantine Empire and the Byzantine Church to be spread among the Slavic peoples, as an antidote to the Latin alphabet and the influence of the Roman Catholic Church.

The Glagolitic alphabet was created by the scholars Saints Cyril and Methodius, brothers born in Thessaloniki. In the 890s, after a few years of persecution from the Germanic clergy and the Pope, the brothers’ disciples found asylum in Bulgaria. They created the Cyrillic alphabet in order to aid their new patron, tzar Boris I, in spreading Christianity among his people. Read more about Boris I, the ruler who Christianized Bulgaria and enlarged it greatly.

Cyrillic script

The literary school of the Bulgarian Empire was very prolific. Volumes and volumes in Old Bulgarian language using the Cyrillic letters were spread across Eastern Europe, thus spreading literacy and knowledge among the Slavic nations.  Today, the Church Slavonic resembles Old Bulgarian, but the Cyrillic alphabet used in different countries has adapted to fit the needs of the ever-changing local spoken languages.

We Bulgarians believe that our language and the Cyrillic alphabet are at least in part our legacy to the world (I have to say in part in order to avoid criticism from overly patriotic Bulgarians as well as criticism from opponents of the historical evidence).

On May 24th, we celebrate the Slavic alphabet!


I met an illegal immigrant today.

I was walking down the street when I heard Bulgarian speech. A delivery boy was sitting on the stairs in front of a pizza place talking on the phone in his mother tongue . I said “Zdrasti!,” and he immediately hung up the phone and came to greet me. We introduced each other and told each other how we’ve both ended up in Boston, so far from home.

He had come as part of a student work brigade in New Jersey a few years ago, and now his visa was “a little expired.”

 In other words, he stayed in the States illegally. He took on low-paid jobs, so that he could make ends meet. He used to  live in New Jersey and had recently moved to Boston. He had started college in Bulgaria but came to the States before he could graduate, so he never earned a degree. 

For the past couple of years, he has been saving up the minimal salary he receives, so that upon returning in Bulgaria (if he does return), he could have a small fortune of American dollars. The “black stamp” he will get in his passport doesn’t scare him at all.

Unfortunately, he is not an exception. Many young people from Eastern Europe come to the States to study or work for a while and stay past the end of their visa term. They don’t have work permits, so they work on low-paid positions and live very modestly. Their presumption is that life is better in the States and that any salary they receive here is much higher than the salary they would receive at an equivalent job back home; plus, their savings would triple when converted into their own currency. What they don’t take into consideration is that the cost of living here is higher as well, that they are alone here, in a foreign culture, and a way of life that is too different from what they are used to.

I refuse to believe that people earn more as illegal immigrants in American than as college graduates and honest working people in their home countries. If indeed they are better off having limited opportunities in the foreign country, then there must be something really wrong with our country and our social system.


Miro’s song Angel Si Ti (You Are an Angel) will represent Bulgaria in Eurovision 2010 in Oslo. The song’s official video was released in March.

Vote for Miro on the semi-finals on May 25th and 27th! Watch the contest streaming live from Oslo. And then vote for him again on May 29th! Let’s vote Bulgaria the European music winner!

Miro wrote the song himself, and you can tell. Another author’s words could never have sounded so sincere and deep. This is my translation of the lyrics:

We were children

Some of us have grown up

Others have not

They remained angels

You have the key

The doors are closed

Behind them lives an angel with wings

You are and angel, don’t you believe?

An angel foretells your path

You are angel, have you forgotten?

Your love proves it

Like an angel, be merciful

An angel in its grace

Mercilessly righteous

You are an angel

Among vivid vanity, be yourself

Don’t replace the truth with lies

Because you are different

You are an angel

You are..

You are..

You are my angel

You are an angel, don’t you believe?

An angel foretells your path

You are angel, have you forgotten?

Your love proves it

***

Read more in my previous post on Miro and Eurovision.

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